Texas investors appeal recently dismissed $7.2 billion Stanford Ponzi case against Proskauer law firm

NEW ORLEANS – Texas investors who for years have accused Proskauer Rose LLP of nurturing the $7.2 billion Robert Allen Stanford Ponzi scheme, appealed their case five days after it was dismissed by a federal judge who said the firm was entitled to attorney immunity.

Lead plaintiffs Sandra Dorrell and Philip Wilkinson filed their appeal Nov. 7 in the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans.

The appeal followed quickly on the heels of the case’s dismissal the previous Thursday, Nov. 2, in the Dallas Division of the Northern District of Texas, which rejected plaintiffs’ arguments that attorney immunity should not apply in their case against Proskauer Rose.

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For a full and open debate on the Stanford receivership visit the Stanford International Victims Group – SIVG official Forum http://sivg.org.ag/



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Antigua Gov’t and WICB move to buy Stanford Cricket Grounds

The government and the West Indies Cricket Board have partnered to purchase the Stanford Cricket Grounds and surrounding properties for US$7.5 million.

The joint venture, which will see the government owning 40 per cent of the shares to WICB’s 60 per cent stake, is expected to attract more premier sporting events.

Under the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), a company called Coolidge Cricket Grounds Inc was formed and will jointly owned by the government and WICB.

Both entities under the MOU will acquire certain properties in Coolidge and Barnes Hill (four parcels of land), which were held by the disgraced investor R Allen Stanford, and which are in the hands of court-appointed liquidators. They include the Car Park, Sticky Wicket Restaurant and The Athletics Club.

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For a full and open debate on the Stanford receivership visit the Stanford International Victims Group – SIVG official Forum http://sivg.org.ag/



Victims of Allen Stanford’s $7B Ponzi Scheme Will Wait Years to Be Repaid

A world-class fraudster’s elaborate spending proves difficult to unwind. 

At first glance, the effort to recover money for victims of Allen Stanford’s $7 billion Ponzi scheme looks a bit like Jarndyce and Jarndyce, the endless chancery court case satirized in Charles Dickens’ book, “Bleak House.” Stanford, you’ll recall, was convicted by a Houston jury in 2012 for swindling investors and sentenced to 110 years in prison.

Eight years into the case, with no end in sight, the receivership set up in Dallas federal court to unwind Stanford’s fraud has turned up only a small percentage of investors’ lost billions. Just as troubling, nearly half of what has been secured so far has gone to pay lawyers and accountants.

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For a full and open debate on the Stanford receivership visit the Stanford International Victims Group – SIVG official Forum http://sivg.org.ag/



Appeals court: Class-action negligence claims can proceed against Louisiana financial regulators in Stanford case

Allegations that Louisiana financial regulators’ failure to perform their duties contributed to the massive losses suffered by hundreds of Louisiana investors in the Stanford Trust Co. debacle can move forward as a class action, a state appeals court in Baton Rouge has ruled.

Phil Preis, the lead attorney for those residents, said Monday the damages sustained by those investors are some $400 million, which includes interest.

Roughly seven dozen mostly south Louisiana residents sued the state Office of Financial Institutions in 2009, essentially claiming OFI turned a blind eye to Stanford owner Robert Allen Stanford’s multibillion-dollar fraud scheme.

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For a full and open debate on the Stanford receivership visit the Stanford International Victims Group – SIVG official Forum http://sivg.org.ag/



Stanford Receiver Renews Fight Over $88M Clawback Verdict

The court-appointed receiver handling the Ponzi implosion of Stanford International Bank asked a Texas federal judge on Thursday to overturn a jury’s decision keeping $88 million in Stanford cash in the hands of the cable and truck-racing magnate who received it shortly before Stanford collapsed.

Receiver Ralph Janvey filed a renewed motion for judgment as a matter of law, asking a judge to undo a jury verdict finding that Janvey cannot claw back the money from Gary Magness’ legal entities. Janvey told U.S. District Judge David Godbey there’s…

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For a full and open debate on the Stanford receivership visit the Stanford International Victims Group – SIVG official Forum http://sivg.org.ag/



Justices Deny Ex-Stanford Advisers’ Arbitration Appeal

The Supreme Court on Tuesday denied a petition from former financial advisers seeking to force arbitration from an alleged $7 billion Ponzi scheme run by R. Allen Stanford, turning down their bid to force arbitration with the funds receiver over $215 million.

Former employees of a Stanford Financial Group and related companies linked to the fraud had petitioned the Supreme Court to reverse a Fifth Circuit ruling against them and in favor of the fund’s receiver. In their petition, the employees claimed the Fifth Circuit diverged from…

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For a full and open debate on the Stanford receivership visit the Stanford International Victims Group – SIVG official Forum http://sivg.org.ag/