$27M In Attys’ Fees OK’d In Stanford Bank Ponzi Scheme Deal

A Texas federal judge approved nearly $27 million in attorneys’ fees on Wednesday as part of a nearly $133 million Stanford Ponzi scheme settlement that he said also merited approval despite objections.

U.S. District Judge David Godbey approved the full amount of the of $26,787,500 request for attorneys’ fees from firms, including Castillo Snyder and Strasburger & Price, that worked on the $132.5 million settlement with the so-called Willis defendants and BMB defendants over their roles in making R. Allen Stanford’s Ponzi scheme seem low-risk and…

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For a full and open debate on the Stanford receivership visit the Stanford International Victims Group – SIVG official Forum http://sivg.org.ag/



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Allen Stanford’s house of cards: How TD banked the 2nd-largest Ponzi scheme in U.S. history

Allen Stanford’s con was epic. He was responsible for the second biggest Ponzi scheme in U.S. history outdone only by Bernie Madoff.

With a silver tongue and endless charisma, the brash Texan built a multi-billion dollar bank on the island of Antigua. By the late 2000s Stanford Financial Group had grown into an empire with over 21,000 clients throughout the U.S. and South America.

When it collapsed in 2009, over $7 billion in investments disappeared in what one U.S. judge would call “one of the most egregious criminal frauds ever presented to a trial jury in federal court.”

To pull off that massive scam, Stanford needed help and he found it in the most unlikely of places – the Toronto Dominion Bank in Canada………………….

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For a full and open debate on the Stanford receivership visit the Stanford International Victims Group – SIVG official Forum http://sivg.org.ag/



Texas Supreme Court will weigh in on the Allen Stanford litigation and the Texas Uniform Fraudulent Transfer Act

The Texas Supreme Court is poised to consider a significant fraudulent transfer case stemming from the Allen Stanford Ponzi scheme. The origins of Janvey v. Golf Channel date back to 2009. In the wake of Stanford’s $7 billion Ponzi scheme, the Northern District of Texas appointed a receiver for Stanford and his related entities. The receiver sued the Golf Channel (among others), claiming the nearly $6 million Stanford paid for advertising was a fraudulent transfer under the Texas Uniform Fraudulent Transfer Act (“TUFTA”).

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For a full and open debate on the Stanford receivership visit the Stanford International Victims Group – SIVG official Forum http://sivg.org.ag/



Receiver files 12th Schedule of Payments to be Made Pursuant to the 1st Interim Distribution Plan

Receiver files 12th Schedule of Payments to be Made Pursuant to the 1st Interim Distribution Plan.

On July 21, 2015, the Receiver filed his 12th Schedule of distribution payments under the 1st Interim Distribution Plan with the United States District Court for the Northern District of Texas, Dallas Division.

The 12th Schedule will be followed by others, each of which will be submitted by the Receiver on a rolling basis as additional responses to Certification Notices are received and processed.

To view a copy of the 12th Schedule, please click here.

For a full and open debate on the Stanford receivership visit the Stanford International Victims Group – SIVG official Forum http://sivg.org.ag/




Kachroo Legal Services Zelaya Update to all Clients 6.11.15



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For a full and open debate on the Stanford receivership visit the Stanford International Victims Group – SIVG official Forum http://sivg.org.ag/


Ex-Stanford Execs’ Convictions Upheld By 5th Circ

Errors committed by a judge in the trial of two former Stanford Financial Group executives sentenced to 20 years in prison for their roles in Robert Allen Stanford’s $7 billion Ponzi scheme were ultimately harmless, the Fifth Circuit ruled Friday.

Former Stanford Financial Group execs Mark Kuhrt, left, and Gilbert Lopez were convicted for their roles in Robert Allen Stanford’s $7 billion Ponzi scheme. (Credit: AP) A three-judge appeals court panel in a published opinion affirmed the 2013 convictions of Gilbert T. Lopez Jr., the former chief accounting…

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For a full and open debate on the Stanford receivership visit the Stanford International Victims Group – SIVG official Forum http://sivg.org.ag/